Narrativium & Things

corinneduyvis:

icountwords:

writewild:

POV Chart

I give this edit A LOT. This chart is very useful. 

Wait though, I don’t get how present vs. past tense affects whether it’s a close or distant PoV? If anything I could see justification for present tense being close & past tense being distant. Either way, I’ve never seen the terms used in this manner.

I don’t think this is a useful chart. But I think the distinction between close and distant first person might be using the logic that past tense the character knows how things relate to each other and can drop hints, whereas in present tense the story happens with them and they can’t necessarily see the story.But I also strongly feel this isn’t really the way to decide. Especially the difference between past and present tense. A lot of that is trend. 10 years ago I wouldn’t touch a present tense story. There weren’t many around and those that were were making a specific point. Not it’s pretty common and often better executed. I might not like it, but I’m less likely to notice it. The proliferation of YA and actiony “now” stories has also helped. View Larger

corinneduyvis:

icountwords:

writewild:

POV Chart

I give this edit A LOT. This chart is very useful. 

Wait though, I don’t get how present vs. past tense affects whether it’s a close or distant PoV? If anything I could see justification for present tense being close & past tense being distant. Either way, I’ve never seen the terms used in this manner.

I don’t think this is a useful chart. But I think the distinction between close and distant first person might be using the logic that past tense the character knows how things relate to each other and can drop hints, whereas in present tense the story happens with them and they can’t necessarily see the story.

But I also strongly feel this isn’t really the way to decide. Especially the difference between past and present tense. A lot of that is trend. 10 years ago I wouldn’t touch a present tense story. There weren’t many around and those that were were making a specific point. Not it’s pretty common and often better executed. I might not like it, but I’m less likely to notice it. The proliferation of YA and actiony “now” stories has also helped.


last-snowfall:

littlemissmutant:

Quote of the Day: “A Richard Dawkins tweet is like a Game of Thrones episode. There are 140 characters & unimaginably awful happens.”
- Philosophy student Gary Holland joins the outcry against Dawkins’s claims that it’s “immoral” to allow Down’s syndrome babies to be born
#YOU TELL ‘EM PHILOSOPHY STUDENT GARY HOLLAND

… … . . fuck YOU Richard Dawkins. Holy shit.
Thumbs up, Philosophy student Gary Holland.

last-snowfall:

littlemissmutant:

Quote of the Day: “A Richard Dawkins tweet is like a Game of Thrones episode. There are 140 characters & unimaginably awful happens.”

- Philosophy student Gary Holland joins the outcry against Dawkins’s claims that it’s “immoral” to allow Down’s syndrome babies to be born

… … . . fuck YOU Richard Dawkins. Holy shit.

Thumbs up, Philosophy student Gary Holland.

(Source: cynical-blogger)


soufex:

freshest-tittymilk:

portraits-of-america:

     “I got both of them from local shelters. When I got her in 2006, the staff told me she was a shepherd husky. I go to the dog park, I’m meeting people with shepherd husky mixes, and they look nothing like her. I get in my car, I’m driving, I look in the rearview mirror, I see these eyes and I’m like, I’ve got a wolf in my car. Then, when she was 10-months old, there was a shepherd breeder and trainer in the dog park, and at the end of the lesson, the trainer came up to me and asked, ‘What kind of dog is that?’ And I’m thinking, Shepherd husky. You should know, you are a breeder. She said, ‘That’s a wolf.’”  
Bethlehem, PA
 

Thats mildly hilarious


ahhhh View Larger

soufex:

freshest-tittymilk:

portraits-of-america:

     “I got both of them from local shelters. When I got her in 2006, the staff told me she was a shepherd husky. I go to the dog park, I’m meeting people with shepherd husky mixes, and they look nothing like her. I get in my car, I’m driving, I look in the rearview mirror, I see these eyes and I’m like, I’ve got a wolf in my car. Then, when she was 10-months old, there was a shepherd breeder and trainer in the dog park, and at the end of the lesson, the trainer came up to me and asked, ‘What kind of dog is that?’ And I’m thinking, Shepherd husky. You should know, you are a breeder. She said, ‘That’s a wolf.’” 

Bethlehem, PA

 

Thats mildly hilarious

ahhhh


When you are 13 years old,
the heat will be turned up too high
and the stars will not be in your favor.
You will hide behind a bookcase
with your family and everything left behind.
You will pour an ocean into a diary.
When they find you, you will be nothing
but a spark above a burning bush,
still, tell them
Despite everything, I really believe people are good at heart.

When you are 14,
a voice will call you to greatness.
When the doubters call you crazy, do not listen.
They don’t know the sound
of their own God’s whisper. Use your armor,
use your sword, use your two good hands.
Do not let their doubting
drown out the sound of your own heartbeat.
You are the Maid of Untamed Patriotism.
Born to lead armies into victory and unite a nation
like a broken heart.

When you are 15, you will be punished
for learning too proudly. A man
will climb onto your school bus and insist
your sisters name you enemy.
When you do not hide,
he will point his gun at your temple
and fire three times. Three years later,
in an ocean of words, with no apologies,
you will stand before the leaders of the world
and tell them your country is burning.

When you are 16 years old,
you will invent science fiction.
The story of a man named Frankenstein
and his creation. Soon after you will learn
that little girls with big ideas are more terrifying
than monsters, but don’t worry.
You will be remembered long after
they have put down their torches.

When you are 17 years old,
you will strike out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig
one right after the other.
Men will be afraid of the lightening
in your fingertips. A few days later
you will be fired from the major leagues
because “Girls are too delicate to play baseball”

You will turn 18 with a baby on your back
leading Lewis and Clark
across North America.

You will turn 18 
and become queen of the Nile.

You will turn 18 
and bring justice to journalism.

You are now 18, standing on the precipice,
trembling before your own greatness.

This is your call to leap.

There will always being those
who say you are too young and delicate
to make anything happen for yourself.
They don’t see the part of you that smolders.
Don’t let their doubting drown out the sound
of your own heartbeat.

You are the first drop of a hurricane.
Your bravery builds beyond you. You are needed
by all the little girls still living in secret,
writing oceans made of monsters and
throwing like lightening.

You don’t need to grow up to find greatness.
You are stronger than the world has ever believed you to be.
The world laid out before you to set on fire.
All you have to do
is burn.

For Teenage Girls With Wild Ambition and Trembling Hearts, Clementine von Radics (via emilyisobsessed)

(Source: clementinevonradics)


[Mark] Latham suggested that Australia adopt voluntary voting because then “parties would have to come up with genuine policies that matter to people to encourage them to go out and vote” and it would “make parties more courageous and genuine”.

But the political science research strongly shows the opposite, with the United States the classic case of a voluntary voting system where the parties are anything but responsive or courageous. They pander to sectional interests because in voluntary voting systems turnout is heavily skewed in favour of the well-off and politicians are keenly aware of their constituency.

No US president has ever been elected by a majority of eligible voters and, in the last US presidential election in 2012, only 54 per cent of the voting age population voted. As in other voluntary systems, people with high incomes, education and occupation dominate voting.

American politics only makes sense when viewed through this prism of politicians who can disregard the needs of non-voters — including the poor, the working poor and the marginalised — without fear of strong electoral consequences.

The abominable US healthcare system, their deregulated, expensive university education system and their harsh and leaky welfare safety net that contributes to high crime rates and entrenched poverty are all the result of politicians knowing they can pretty safely ignore the needs of all but those who vote — and who donate.

This is why I support compulsory voting.

It’s not perfect by any stretch, but it’s infinitely better than the alternative.

(via themyskira)

It’s just not democratic if you’re not having everyone vote.


medievalpoc:

[part of a series on this exhibit]

xanthy-m submitted to medievalpoc:

Not entirely sure if I should include this and the next one but I’ll do it anyways:
this is one of the skeletons in the bit about disabilities.

As a disabled person and someone whose day job involves ensuring PWD/disabled people receive equal access to education, this is very much relevant to the mission of this blog.

Although this display deals with prehistory and disability in society, it sets a solid framework for other posts I have made on the topic of disability in European history, from an art history, literary,  and sociological perspective.

It is ableism today that shapes our ideas about what people’s attitudes toward disability in the past were, and how disabled people were treated in their societies. As always, it is my hope that having a greater understanding of history can help shift our views of disability in society from a kind of individual tragedy, towards a society that considers disability as a kind of human variation that should and must be considered in everything from educational planning, architecture and civic planning, to the way our appliances (which are a form of adaptive technology themselves!) are designed. Keep in mind: people of color and disabled people are not mutually exclusive categories.

I think that examining the evidence of the lives of disabled people from the past, sometimes the far distant past, will cause us to question why and how in this day and age, we still consider disability to be “Other”, and how our society is constructed to exclude in so many ways, rather than having our world and material objects designed in such a way to be accessible to everyone.